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 Terms & glossary

 163 terms found ...

 Term  Definition
 Akadama (Aka dama tsuchi) Type of soil normally used for bonsai. It is very porous with excellent moisture retention.
 Ara kawa sho A tree showing a rough bark.
 Ara ki or ara gi A tree that is potted the first time to be trained.
 Atama / [ Ju ] Shin The top or apex of a tree.
 Bankan The "coiled trunk" bonsai style. The trunk slants to all sides and normally has only branches at the top.
 Bon Ceramic container or pot in which bonsai is planted.
 Bon kei Natural landscapes in a pot.
 Bunjingi or Bunjin The "literati" bonsai style. One of the basic styles. The idea behind Bunjingi is that in nature the tree, under adverse environmental conditions, has found its way to survive, being forced to contortions and unnormal shapes. (See also section Bonsai styles in Encyclopedia).
 Chiu Tree up to 12" - 24" tall.
 Chokkan The "formal upright" bonsai style. One of the basic styles. Branch style. Essential for this style is a straight trunk with a naturally balanced branch structure. (See also section Bonsai styles in Encyclopedia).
 Chokkon The main root that grows straight down from the center of the trunk.
 Dai The table on which the bonsai is positioned.
 Dai ki (Oya ki) The parent plant. Parent tree.
 Dou buki New growth on trunk or branch caused by pruning.
 Eda bone The branch structure on a tree. (See also Mae eda, Ushiro eda, Uke eda, Kuitsuki eda, Sashi eda).
 Eda jun The subsequent sequence of the branching.
 Eda tanya Branch extending from the trunk with subsequent ramification to form a horizontal pad. (See also Eda-wari).
 Eda tsugi Branch craft.
 Eda uchi The harmonizing effect of the branches.
 Eda-nuki The process of removing unwanted branches.
 Eda-wari Tree showing various Eda tanya branch pads. (See also Eda tanya).
 Eda-zashi The proces of branch pruning.
 Fukinagashi The "windswept" bonsai style. One of the basic styles. This windswept style simulates the effect of extreme exposure to strong winds. (See also section Bonsai styles in Encyclopedia).
 Gi sei shi (Gi sei eda) A branch left to grow only for overall growth of the tree. Also called "Sacrifice branch".
 Gobo-ne The tap root.
 Gokan The "five-trunk" bonsai style.
 Goro tsuchi Course soil that is used at the bottom of the pot for good drainage.
 Ha gari Leaf pinching.
 Ha mizu Moistening the leafs with water.
 Ha zashi Leaf pruning.
 Hachi See Bon.
 Han-Kengai The "semi-cascade" bonsai style. One of the basic styles. The trunk grows straight for a while and then cascades down at a slight angle, not as dramatic as in the cascade style. (See also section Bonsai styles in Encyclopedia).
 Hari gane kake The wiring of a tree.
 Hinoki False cypress
 Hokidachi The "broom" bonsai style. Branch style. The branch formation on the top of the tree look like an upside down broom.
 Hon bachi Bonsai dish.
 Hon bachi age Tree that is shown at exhibition with special high-class pot.
 Ikada buki The "raft" bonsai style. The plant is planted sideways with some of the branches showing out of the soil. These branches are the future trees. Special form of the Yosu-Ue (wood) style.
 Iki michi The live part of the trunk. (See also Jin and Shari).
 Is sai sho For a bonsai it is the first year it blooms, unites or roots.
 Ishi tsuki (ishi duke) The "clinging to a rock" or "rock grown" bonsai style. Composition style. Tree is planted partially on a rock with the root involving part of the stone.
 Ji dai Age. Basic for bonsai, you talk about a "good Jidai".
 Jin (Eda-jin) One of the "dead wood" techniques. The intention is to give the tree an old and lightly damaged look. Most seen on conifers. Jins are applied on a branch or the top of the tree. (See also Shari, Sabamiki).
 Ju sei The vigor of growth. The character of the tree.
 Ju shin Top of the tree, includes apex and top branches.
 Ka numa tsuchi Kanuma soil. High moisture retention and very good drainage.
 Kabu wake The separation of the roots.
 Kabudachi The "clump" bonsai style.
 Kan nuki eda (Kuruma eda) A branch that must be cut off.
 Kan rei sha Cloth used for frost protection in winter as well as sun protection in summer.
 Kan sui Watering.
 Kanju Deciduos tree.
 Kann jou hakuhi The process of developing roots by peeling bark off a branch at width of and covering it with sphagnum moss.
 Karai [Mizu ga] Sparingly appliance of water.
 Karami nei Tangled and intertwining roots that should not appear at the surface.
 Kari komi The pruning of leaves and branches.
 Karusu Callous. The healing process of a wound.
 Kata eda A tree with branches appearing only on one side of the trunk.
 Kata ne A tree with roots appearing only on one side of the trunk.
 Katamaru (Sekka sho) The hardening of a new growth into a branch. Hardening characteristic.
 Ke sho tsuchi Decorative soil.
 Kei sei sou Cambium.
 Kengai (Ken gai ju kei) The "cascade" bonsai style. One of the basic styles. The trunk starts growing upward, but then turns downward and reaches a point below the base of the pot. (See also section Bonsai styles in Encyclopedia).
 Keto tsuchi Peat.
 Kiki eda Point of tree to focus on. Can be the primer branch. (See also Ushiro Eda, Uke Eda, Kuitsuki Eda, Sashi Eda, Mae Eda).
 Kiri komi Trimming. Pruning.
 Kiri modoshi Cutting back.
 Ko eda Very elegant branch.
 Koke jun A tree with a large trunk base which narrows as it extends to the apex.
 Komochi See Sokan.
 Koshi daka Tree with high waist. The distance between the base of the tree and the first branch is too long.
 Koshi mizu Bonsai pot placed in a large container of water with the water seeping into the soil through the drainage holes.
 Kuitsuki eda Short complementary branch, smaller than the rest of the branches, gives the tree naturalism. (See also Ushiro eda, Uke eda, Mae eda, Sashi eda).
 Kuro tsuchi Black loam.
 Kyoku duke Wiring to bend trunk and branches.
 Mae eda Front branch, always positioned upon the lower half of the tree. (See also Ushiro eda, Uke eda, Kuitsuki eda, Sashi eda).
 Mame Tree up to 6" tall.
 Me tsumi Pinching of leaves.
 Mei boku (Rou boku) Very old and elegant bonsai.
 Mi mono Tree that bears fruits.
 Mi sho Plant grown from seed.
 Mi sho mono Bonsai raised from seed.
 Mizu gire Too dry.
 Mizu goe In water dissolved fertilizer.
 Mizu goke Sphagnum moss.
 Mizu sui (See also Iki michi).
 Moyogi The "informal upright" bonsai style. One of the basic styles. Similar to the formal upright style, but the top of the trunk instead of growing straight bends slightly to the front. (See also section Bonsai styles in Encyclopedia).
 Ne bari Part of the spread root formation of the tree that is visible.
 Ne buse (Ne zashi) Root pruning.
 Ne Tsugi Root grafting.
 Ne Tsunagari The "connected root" bonsai style.
 Ne-Agari The "exposed root" bonsai style.
 Nejikan The "twisted trunk" bonsai style.
 Oi komi Shortening back close to the trunk.
 Oki goe Fertiliser, normally in powder form.
 Saba miki One of the "dead wood" techniques. The intention is to give the tree an old and lightning damaged look. Most seen on conifers. Sabamiki is the denomination for hollow trunks. (See also Jin, Shari).
 Sai kei Landscape with rocks and trees.
 Saku The process of "composing" a tree.
 Sankan The "triple trunk" bonsai style.
 Sashi eda (Ishi no eda) Primer branch which marks direction and movement of the tree. (See also Ushiro eda, Uke eda, Kuitsuki eda, Mae eda).
 Sashi ho Cutting.
 Sashi kan The main tree or trunk.
 Sashi ki Propagation with cuttings.
 Sashiki Plant grown from cuttings.
 Sei shi The training of bonsai.
 Seki Straw mat, tatami.
 Seki kazari The form a bonsai is displayed.
 Sekijoju The "tree planted on rock" bonsai style. Tree is planted on a well formed rock (simulating mountain, slope etc.)
 Sekkai iou gouzai Lime sulfure mix used to control insects and mites.
 Sekkan (Setsu kan) Distance between two nodes.
 Sekkan ga tobu Too long distance between buds or branches.
 Sen tei The planning and trimming of a tree.
 Shakkan The "slanting" bonsai style. One of the basic styles. Shakkan style can be considered the intermediate stadium between the informal upright and cascade styles as the tree still grows up, but tends to bend down. (See also section Bonsai styles in Encyclopedia).
 Shari One of the "dead wood" techniques. The intention is to give the tree an old and lightning damaged look. Most seen on conifers. In contrast to Jins Shari is a dead part on the trunk. (See also Jin, Sabamiki).
 Sharimiki The "driftwood" bonsai style.
 Shidare-Zukuri The "weeping branches" bonsai style.
 Shime komu The process to maintain compact ramification.
 Shin sho New branch growth during the ongoing year.
 Shita eda Single or group of lower branches.
 Shito Tree up to 3" tall.
 Sho The special quality of an individual characeristic of the tree.
 Sho haku Conifers.
 Shohin Tree up to 10" tall.
 Shoki Bonsai made of recollected specimen.
 Shu boku The main tree of a display.
 Soe Ornamentary complement to a tree.
 Sokan (Sou kan) The "twin trunk" bonsai style.
 Soko ne Bottom part of the root appearing directly under the trunk.
 Sui ban A water basin. Pot without water drainage hole.
 Sui seki Rocky landscape set up on sui ban (pot without water drainage hole).
 Sukasu Thinning of the leaves' volume.
 Tachi agari Part of the trunk from the base of the tree up to the first branch.
 Taka ue Planting the tree at a soil level that is higher than the rim of the pot.
 Tama hi Round organic fertilizer balls.
 Tan gei Bonsai material.
 Tan shi Short branch grown during one year.
 Tan yo hou Short leaf method. (See also Mekiri).
 Tana kazari Bonsai tree displayed in a shelf.
 Tana wari Distance between root shelfs. (See also Eda tanya, Eda wari).
 Tankan The "single trunk" bonsai style.
 Tatekae Reshaping of the tree structure.
 Teki shin Removal of shoots.
 Ten Apex or top of the tree.
 To cho shi A branch that has grown to long only used to thicken branches or trunk.
 Tori ki The process of developing roots by peeling bark off a trunk. Upper part of the trunk is cut off to develop another tree.
 Tori ki mono Bonsai developed with Tori ki layering technique.
 Toushi tsugi Grafting method by threading the scion through a hole drilled through the trunk or branch.
 Tsugi ho Scion. A small piece of plant tissue (the scion) that is made to unite with an established plant (the stock - Dai ki)
 Tsugi ki The process of grafting trees.
 Tsugi ki mono The process of grafting bonsai.
 Tsukami yose Clustered bonsai style. Many seedlings placed with roots intertwined which will fuse together and appear as a single multi-trunk tree or group.
 Ue tsuchi Planting soil.
 Ue tsuke kaku do Angle in which a bonsai is planted.
 Uke eda Counterweight to Sashi eda branch placed at opposite side of the tree. Gives the tree its balance. (See also Ushiro eda, Sashi eda, Kuitsuki eda, Mae eda).
 Ushiro eda Back branch, improves the perspective of the tree. (See also Uke eda, Sashi eda, Kuitsuki eda, Mae eda).
 Uwa ne Surface roots.
 Uwa tsuchi Surface soil.
 Waka gi Young tree which is a good material for a bonsai.
 Yama dori Collecting plants directly from nature.
 Yama dori mono Collecting bonsai directly from nature.
 Yobi tsugi Approach graft. Use a live branch of parent tree to fill a void.
 Yosu-Ue The "wood" bonsai style. Group planting composition style. Various trees are planted in the same pot forming a little "wood".
 Za Seat or base. Artistic presentation of base of the tree and nebari.


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